Category Archives: Blog

Jukely: Another Tech Company Undermining Artists

Recently I’ve become acquainted with Jukely, a subscription-based web service that, for a $25 monthly fee, gives music-goers the ability to attend “unlimited” shows without paying a cover charge. There are limitations to the service in that not all venues/concerts are available through their site, each concert has a limited number of passes, and, from what I understand, subscribers can only reserve a spot for one concert at a time. On the back end the service will pay the venue less than 50% of the ticket price for each member who attends a show.

Even with these limitations, as someone trying to figure out a sustainable (read: non-punishing-debt-accruing) way to perform quality music with professional musicians, this seems like a way for people who are entirely removed from the creative process to insert themselves between musicians and their audience while A) extracting money from that interaction, B) adding nothing of value to it, and, most importantly, C) driving down the perceived cost of live music.  Continue reading Jukely: Another Tech Company Undermining Artists

When the Next Mega-Quake Hits, Phish Will Still Be Mediocre

Many in Seattle and across the northwest have read, shared, and reacted with shock to last weekend’s New Yorker article concerning the large-scale seismic event brewing beneath our region. While skeptics and scientists may quibble over details, one thing remains clear: when the next Really Big One hits, however extensive the devastation, Phish will still be mediocre.

Science
Seismic Data: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/shakemap/list.php?x=1&n=pn
Phish Data: ears

Continue reading When the Next Mega-Quake Hits, Phish Will Still Be Mediocre

The Value of Live Music

With all the spreading awareness of a living wage and the scuffles I’ve seen lately between musicians and venues, I thought I’d gently prod all you music lovers, musicians, and venues to do your best to communicate the true value of live music. The fact is that often there just isn’t enough money being generated to get everyone compensated fairly for the effort involved in putting on a good show, and it’s up to us to change that. Musicians in the 80’s were earning the same amount of money for a night’s work as today’s are, and I know venues are feeling the squeeze as well. Continue reading The Value of Live Music

Seattle’s Musicians Rate Seattle’s Venues

Back in March, I wrote a post about my experience with the business of live music in Seattle, outlining the frustrations many musicians deal with when working with local venues, the terms I think are fair when performing, and the clubs I support and avoid based on the relative fairness of their relationship with musicians. My goal was to let the live music audience in on the actual business of live music and urge them to support venues that give musicians a fair shake. My personal list was met with lots of feedback from other players, venue owners and staff, and people who go out to see music, many of whom agreed generally but had different experiences with the venues I listed.

With that in mind, I distributed a survey to Seattle’s working musicians asking them to list the clubs that do the best and worst job of compensating bands fairly and working with them to put on successful shows. The goal was to get beyond anecdotes and personal opinions to really uncover which venues are musician-friendly and which ones aren’t. The survey was shared on social media and emailed between musicians for about 6 weeks, resulting in 128 responses from what I feel is a group of players that represents accurately the average working musician. Here are the results of that survey:

Participant Genres

Question: In your experience, which venue or venues do the BEST/WORST job of working with musicians to put on successful shows and compensate musicians fairly? (See the full survey here) Continue reading Seattle’s Musicians Rate Seattle’s Venues

Musicians: Rate Seattle’s Music Venues

About a month ago I wrote this, a post about the business models musicians in Seattle have to deal with when performing at one of the city’s many live music venues. I wrote about what I think is fair, what I think isn’t, and listed the venues I think do a good job of working with musicians and the ones I avoid because I think they take advantage of performers.

In the time since, I’ve spoken with owners and employees of a handful of venues and have gotten a clearer picture of their side of the equation. Those conversations have forced me to re-evaluate what I think is fair (more on that to come later), but have also re-enforced my position that the live music attending audience needs to know about the places musicians love and the ones they don’t.

To that end, I’ve created a survey intended to be taken by Seattle’s working musicians. I hope to get it to as many of them as I can, and think that with enough participation some trends will start to emerge. To be sure, there are a lot of venues in town, but from my conversations with players of all genres, I know there are standouts on both ends of the spectrum.

The survey itself is short and should only take a couple of minutes to get through, so please submit your input and share this link with other musicians in town. Thanks in advance for your time and effort.

The survey is closed. Results coming soon.