Category Archives: Blog

Musicians: Rate Seattle’s Music Venues

About a month ago I wrote this, a post about the business models musicians in Seattle have to deal with when performing at one of the city’s many live music venues. I wrote about what I think is fair, what I think isn’t, and listed the venues I think do a good job of working with musicians and the ones I avoid because I think they take advantage of performers.

In the time since, I’ve spoken with owners and employees of a handful of venues and have gotten a clearer picture of their side of the equation. Those conversations have forced me to re-evaluate what I think is fair (more on that to come later), but have also re-enforced my position that the live music attending audience needs to know about the places musicians love and the ones they don’t.

To that end, I’ve created a survey intended to be taken by Seattle’s working musicians. I hope to get it to as many of them as I can, and think that with enough participation some trends will start to emerge. To be sure, there are a lot of venues in town, but from my conversations with players of all genres, I know there are standouts on both ends of the spectrum.

The survey itself is short and should only take a couple of minutes to get through, so please submit your input and share this link with other musicians in town. Thanks in advance for your time and effort.

The survey is closed. Results coming soon.

Seattle’s Live Music Business Model is Broken

Disclaimer: This is not about guilting musicians for playing at clubs with bad deals or badmouthing venues for setting what are, in my opinion, ridiculous terms. This is about informing the live music audience of the realities behind putting on these shows and what I see as an unsustainable situation, and trying to move past the usual finger-pointing and complaining so we can have a constructive, open discussion about what is fair and why.

Every few months the Seattle musician community erupts with outrage over a particularly awful night at one of the city’s many live music venues. For whatever reason there was a breakdown in communication between the musicians and venue, who each had different expectations about the cover, room fee, sound situation, promotion, set times, etc. We all quietly piss and moan to each other after last call, rarely letting our audience know what happened for fear of burning bridges. The fervor dies down and a few weeks later we’re back to where we started, playing the same venues with crowds none the wiser, waiting for the next time one of us gets a raw deal so we can repeat the cycle.

There have been a few solutions thrown out there, all basically centered around some kind of union. Musicians would organize and collectively decide on a set of acceptable terms for playing these venues. The problem I see is that I can’t tell another musician what they’re worth. If someone wants to play for less than ideal terms for exposure or getting more playing experience, that’s their choice. Everyone has their own idea of what they need to be happy and I can’t change that.

In my view, the key to a solution to all of this is information and fairness. Continue reading Seattle’s Live Music Business Model is Broken